Paris Zoological Park in Paris, France - Bernard Tschumi Architects

One of the oldest cage-free zoos in the world, The Paris Zoological Park has long been a proponent of animal conservation since its opening in 1934. Of over 85 species housed at the zoo, most are considered endangered with habitats that are near-destruction and are thus directly benefiting from the zoo’s efforts. Situated in the historical Parc de Vincennes, the relatively small zoo (about 15 ha) is marked by nearly one century of evolution on the safeguarding and the presentation of the animals of the world in an urban environment. 

architectural-review:

Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Chapel, Wachendorf.
Charcoal and pencil.

architectural-review:

Peter Zumthor’s Bruder Klaus Chapel, Wachendorf.

Charcoal and pencil.

Time Slice - Richard Silver

My primary goal as an artist and as a person is to photograph the world as I travel in an effort to savor and share my life experiences. I enjoy having the power to transform the commonplace day into something that is unique and memorable. By employing techniques such as Tilt Shift, HDR, Vertical Panoramas and Time Slice, this allows me to grow as a photographer while exposing our everyday world in an altered visual context. 

Ultimately I am driven by exploration and discovery which my photography affords me the opportunity to travel the globe translating the visceral into the visual. By sharing my perspective with others I aim not only to present a photograph but also a lens into my feelings and outlook in a particular moment. Photography and travel may as well be one word to me. My goal as an artist is to “X” off as many places around the world until I run out of places or run out of time.

Artist’s personal biographies usually bother me, but this dude is pretty honest about what he’s trying to do and how he plans to go about doing it. Respect, Silver.

arquilatria:

The Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York, 1958 Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson

arquilatria:

The Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York, 1958
Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson

(Source: accessibleexclusivity, via thomortiz)

This blog has never directly dealt with products or advertisement, but every so often, I stumble across a well-designed and well-marketed piece that gets me excited enough to click the “Add to Amazon Wishlist” button in my browser and oggle every few weeks.

Made in the Ancient Roman city of Detroit, Michigan, The Floyd Leg easily attaches to just about any planar material to make one of the quickest (and in my often not so humble opinion, most efficient) work stations you can get without a wood-shop in the immediate vicinity.

While paying around $200 might seem unreasonable for a set of metal legs with adjustable clamps, the Floyd Leg is what industrial design looks like at its finest: direct, well-crafted, easy-to-use, and available in more than two colors. 

poetarchy:

Fountain of Purification from the Mosque of Sultan Hassan, Cairo. Maison Bonfils, 1876-1885.

poetarchy:

Fountain of Purification from the Mosque of Sultan Hassan, Cairo. Maison Bonfils, 1876-1885.

(via dhmvintageviews)

archimodels:

© unknown author - le corbusier modeling his palace of the soviets proposal - moscow, USSR - 1930

archimodels:

© unknown author - le corbusier modeling his palace of the soviets proposal - moscow, USSR - 1930

archiveofaffinities:

Model of the Palace of the Soviets, 1939 World’s Fair, New York, New York 

archiveofaffinities:

Model of the Palace of the Soviets, 1939 World’s Fair, New York, New York 

enginedynamicsinc:

Construction of King Ludwig II Neuschwanstein castle in Bavaria, Germany. Construction was from 1869 - 1880.

enginedynamicsinc:

Construction of King Ludwig II Neuschwanstein castle in Bavaria, Germany. Construction was from 1869 - 1880.

(via dhmvintageviews)

samsaranmusing:

This is the first photograph of a human being ever taken. It was taken by Daguerre in 1843. The exposure time was ten minutes but the man stood still because he was getting his boots blacked.

samsaranmusing:

This is the first photograph of a human being ever taken. It was taken by Daguerre in 1843. The exposure time was ten minutes but the man stood still because he was getting his boots blacked.

(via dhmvintageviews)

Elevated Thinking: The High Line in New York City

Even though it might as well have been taken straight out of the Gospel According to Bloomberg, this short documentary brought to you by the good people at Great Museums (HAH!) is actually phenomenal. Featuring interviews with the never-not-smiling former director of the NYC Department of City Planning Amanda Burden and soul patch wielding architect-extraordinaire Ricardo Scofidio, the film is fantastic way to spend fifty-six minutes and forty-nine seconds for anyone even remotely interested in one of the most important public works projects of the twenty-first century.

The Ruins of Normandy: Color Photos From France, 1944 - Frank Scherschel

The ruins left behind after warfare speak a language of their own. Even more strikingly, no matter where the conflict has taken place — whether it’s in northern Europe or the South Pacific, the Middle East or Central Africa — the vernacular of destruction is often the same. Buildings reduced to rubble and dust. A scarred, tortured landscape seemingly devoid of life, aside from small human forms trying to piece it back together. Twisted, rusting, abandoned vehicles. And always, above it all, the indifferent sky.

Before and After D-Day: Color Photos From England and France, 1944 - Frank Scherschel

"Paris is like a magic sword in a fairy tale — a shining power in those hands to which it rightly belongs, in other hands tinsel and lead. Whenever the City of Light changes hands, Western Civilization shifts its political balance. So it has been for seven centuries; so it was in 1940; so it was last week." — LIFE after the French capital was liberated in August 1944.

hismarmorealcalm:

Portrait Head of Augustus circa AD 50 (Julio-Claudian)

hismarmorealcalm:

Portrait Head of Augustus circa AD 50 (Julio-Claudian)

(via solomoncohen)

ppmj:

Luis Barragan

ppmj:

Luis Barragan

(via thomortiz)